Episode 45

full
Published on:

29th Nov 2023

All Up in the Biz

Biz Markie was the "Clown Prince of Hip Hop". He paved his own way in the industry and in turn, opened doors for future legends. He was like a big kid and larger than life. Even in death, nobody beats the Biz. (Nobody Beats the Biz!) But what was the late, great Biz Markie really like? 

All Up in the Biz on IMDb

Where to Watch: Showtime

Credits

Hip Hop Movie Club is produced by your HHMC's: Boogie, JB and DynoWright! Theme music by Boogie.   

Hit us up at hiphopmovieclub@gmail.com or on TikTok, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @hiphopmovieclub. You can also check us out at hiphopmovieclub.com.  

On the next episode of the Hip Hop Movie Club podcast, your HHMCs will discuss In Too Deep. Subscribe today in your favorite podcast app and you won't miss it!  

Shout out to you listeners. Thanks for tuning in. 

And remember: Don't hate, accommodate.

Mentioned in this episode:

Brain Freeze Trivia

Shout to Brain Freeze Trivia in the Lehigh Valley! Follow them @brain_freeze_trivia on Instagram

Transcript
Speaker:

Biz Markie was the clown prince of hip

hop.

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:

He paved his own way in the industry and

in turn opened doors for future legends.

3

:

He was like a big kid and larger than

life.

4

:

Even in death.

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:

Nobody beats the biz.

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:

Nobody beats the Biz

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:

the Biz.

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:

But what was the late, great Biz Markie

really like?

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Welcome to Hip Hop Movie Club.

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:

This is a show for Gen X hip hop fans who

want to relive the glory days and

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reconsider classic and modern hip hop

films from a current day perspective.

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Together we'll explore some of the larger

societal issues raised in these films.

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If you've

seen today's movie before, then you'll

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learn some fascinating trivia you might

have missed.

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If you haven't seen today's movie before,

then we'll help you decide whether this

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film is worth your time.

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Either way, you'll be a smarter hip hop

fan by the end of this episode.

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The next 30 minutes or so, you'll get all

this and more.

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We're three old heads who put their old

heads together to vibe on these films for

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you.

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I'm DynoWright, podcaster, filmmaker,

long time hip hop fan, and I got to see

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Biz Markie make a surprise appearance at a

Beastie Boys / Tribe Called Quest show.

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I'm JB, 80s and 90s nostalgia junkie, long

time hip hop fan, and Special Ed’s, “I'm the

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Magnificent” is one of my all time favorite

tracks, and I will often jokingly sing the

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first verse when fake bragging about

something with my family.

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I'm Boogie, a DJ, long time hip hop fan.

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I've seen Biz Markie perform as an MC

during I Love the 90s tour and also as a

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DJ for a concert we held at Rider

University.

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Ooh.

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In this episode, we'll answer the

question, was Biz Markie more than just

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a friend?

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All Up In The Biz is a documentary movie

celebrating the life and impact of the

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beloved Biz Markie.

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The playful Biz left an indelible mark on

the world of hip hop and all those who he

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encountered including other hip hop

legends such as Rakim, Big Daddy Kane,

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Doug E. Fresh, and entertainers Tracy

Morgan and Nick Cannon.

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All Up In The Biz is available for viewing

on Showtime or for purchase on Amazon

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Prime Video.

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All right, let's get right into it.

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Boogie, what did you learn about

Biz Markie’s upbringing from this episode

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that you didn't know prior?

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Yeah, so most of what I knew about Biz

Markie was that he was from Long Island.

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But what I didn't realize is that he was

originally from Harlem and he lived there

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until he was 10 years old.

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And he said, after his mom passed away,

his family ended up homeless.

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And then Biz ended up in foster care.

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And he said, he became good at snapping on

people because people would always try to

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test him.

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And he said, he knew how to close doors.

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and didn't share too many aspects of his

upbringing.

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I guess it was a little traumatic for him.

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I said one of the first tapes he heard was

the L Brothers from the Bronx.

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I was like, okay, that's throwback right

there.

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And he heard Busy B rhyming and said, you

know what, I'm gonna make my name Busy Biz

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Markie.

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And I was like, that's kind of dope.

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But yeah, I liked that he used to roll

with the Groove Line crew.

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I heard them mention like,

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before, but I didn't hear too much about

them until this documentary.

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And then also, one of the things that I

caught was that we were talking about the

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Vapors.

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I knew that it was actually a true story,

but the actual name of the Source Crew,

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that was actually their name.

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I was like, oh, he used the actual name in

the video.

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So that was, that was, I was a little wild

right there.

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Great stuff.

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DynoWright, any comments about upbringing

of Biz Markie that you'd learned?

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I mean, I didn't really know anything

about Biz Markie, surprisingly.

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And so everything was new to me.

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It was, I'm glad they talked about his

struggle to get noticed and how he, he was

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doing the dozens and he was snapping and

what he got accepted.

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People accepted him.

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So his persistence went a long way.

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Yeah, I learned about, I guess,

non-traditional upbringing with multiple

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foster siblings.

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And he was always a character, they were

saying, a couple of the foster siblings

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were saying.

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One of the first things he said to them

was, I'm allergic to grass and medically,

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I need to wear Pro-Keds.

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That's a medical condition.

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And when he was running around, like

playing football or whatever, he would

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literally run in slow motion.

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Like he was always hamming it up.

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Yeah.

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That was funny.

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Some of the interesting facts about

Biz Markie or insight into how he was, was

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that playful nature.

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I loved seeing how he was such a major

collector of all things retro.

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Always wanted to say, I bet you don't

have this or have the first one of these

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ever made.

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That was awesome to see.

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You guys pick up on some of those things

as well?

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Absolutely.

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The Charlie's Angels figures.

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I'm a big Charlie’s Angels fan from, from

the seventies.

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Totally down with this.

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The Rock'em Sock'em Robots that he was

saying, you know, I still got my Rock'em

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Sock'em Robots up in the attic so I can

relate to that.

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And I'm a collector of things too.

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I got old Transformers and G.I.

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Joe figures and Silverhawks and He-Man and

all that stuff.

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Yeah, got a bunch of that stuff upstairs.

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And then Biz Markie's widow was holding up

that 70s electronic handheld football

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game.

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I loved that game so much.

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It was a great game, Electronic

Quarterback.

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Oh man, my brother and I on these long car

rides, we would play that back and forth.

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It was just the red dashes, how you would

go behind the defender and you can pass

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through the one defender.

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Hours and hours we would play on that

thing.

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I wish I had that again.

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I knew they did re-release it like a few

years back.

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I gotta, you can get that.

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That was cool.

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Yeah, my cousins and I had various

versions.

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We had football, baseball, soccer.

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Those games were cool.

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It's like, it's so entertaining.

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It's so funny when you look at it now, now

an app on your phone is like so much

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better.

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Compare that to like Subway Surfer app or

one of these things that the kids have.

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And you're like, Oh my God, I can't

believe we were entertained by these

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dashes and dots, but we were.

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Weird.

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Hahaha.

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Yeah, and I'm so addicted to Subway

Surfer.

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So I'm like laughing on the inside when

you said that I play like every day.

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Oh, that's a great.

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That's mad fun.

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That's funny.

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Any other interesting facts about

Biz Markie’s

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come up.

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That you picked up on.

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Yeah, I think like I knew that he was

generally like throughout the hip hop

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community, but it was just cool to see how

he made friends by traveling all over the

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place and meeting artists.

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It started off how he used to go

from school to school, like performing

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la-di-da-di, which is kind of funny

because I'm like, dude, you got on by

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perpetrating.

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And then he's saying, you know what?

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Yeah, that was...

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I was like, he lied!

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He was a liar.

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He said that was his song.

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So it was like a fake it to make it.

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They said he was faking it till he makes

it.

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He would go to the schools and start

performing La Di Da Di and saying it was his

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song.

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Aw man, that's hilarious.

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And I like how Rakim said how he walked up

to Wyandanch and just started beatboxing.

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Rakim was like, oh, that's a beat.

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And then he just walked over and started

freestyling on the beat.

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And they just started bonding over that

and he started traveling all over Long

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Island and different boroughs.

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And it was funny because as they were

interviewing different people, everybody

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was just kind of saying the same thing.

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I don't know, he just kind of appeared.

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He was just there.

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He just kinda appeared.

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He was just there.

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Like nobody can really pinpoint where he

just popped before the scene.

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It's like he just was there all of a

sudden.

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And it was cool.

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Like, you know, Doug E. Fresh was talking

about how they became friends and how he

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just popped up at his house and just was

hanging out.

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He just kept coming back.

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Dapper Dan had, you know,

similar stories.

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It's like, that was kind of cool.

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Like he just...

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He just became so beloved because he was

so personal and just wanted to meet

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people.

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That was really cool.

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That was the most impressive aspect of

this for me, is his hustle that he had.

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He was an MC and then he fell in love with

Doug E. Fresh's beatboxing and he said,

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teach me how, and he would show up at his

house every day for like three weeks and

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just study him and learn the beatboxing

techniques.

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And then later on when that quote unquote

scandal came about with the sampling and

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he got in trouble for the sampling.

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He's like, that's it, I'm done with this.

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I'm gonna learn how to DJ.

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And he became a world renowned DJ, huge

corporate parties, huge celebrities would

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invite him.

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He just taught himself how to spin and he

just kept reinventing himself, which was

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incredible.

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That sampling controversy was the song

“Alone Again” by Gilbert O'Sullivan, the

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lawsuit.

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It was a shame because he was denied to

clear the sample, but he just proceeded to

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use it anyway.

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Some said that he should have just asked

for forgiveness rather than permission,

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like instead of just use it.

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Cause back then, if he didn't know, how

much hip hop is Gilbert O'Sullivan

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listening to?

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And it wasn't like there was social media.

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Like he may not even got word that song

was out.

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So sometimes it's better just go for it.

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Right, there's a lot of groups that

sampled a ton of stuff back then that they

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got through before the sanctions really

started coming out.

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Yup.

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But I think that soured him to the whole

record industry and then transitioning to

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a DJ and he made it to the top of the rung

there.

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Yup.

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He used to, I've seen clips of him.

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He used to DJ sets using just 45 records.

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So he would just have 45s.

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And he had a pair of custom made Technics 1200s that just for 45s.

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And I'm like, wow, like.

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I don't even know how much money it cost

to get those because just to get a pair of

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Technics 1200 by themself, you will run a

bit at least, you know, if you want to get

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a new pair, you're gonna run at least a

grand.

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Or so you're looking at 500, at least 500

up and then you get them customized for

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the 45s.

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I'm like, wow, that's crazy.

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But he's an amazing, he was an amazing DJ.

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Yeah, I love his story of how he emerged.

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And like you said, he just showed up

everywhere when he got tied in with this

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Mix Master Mike and Dave, the promoters.

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And then I love the story how he met Big

Daddy Kane over at Albee Square in

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Brooklyn.

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And he, at first he came there to battle

him.

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And then he's like joking around with

them.

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He's like, listen, I got to introduce you

to these guys.

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Mike and Dave gets Big Daddy Kane on the

shows.

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It gets his name out there.

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And he says, I'll get you a record deal.

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He just kind of threw it out there and he

followed through with it.

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Craziest thing too, is that Biz entered

Rakim in an MC contest in Harlem and Rakim

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did not win that contest.

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I'm like, how does he not win MC contests?

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Seems impossible!

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I need to find who this guy is that beat him and we gotta

hear some of his stuff.

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Come on now.

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And Rakim was yeah.

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He said the guy's name, I forget what it

was.

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Yeah, he did.

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I can't remember.

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He said he saw.

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Yeah, he said it was in his, you know, he

was in Harlem.

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So that probably had a little sway to it,

but still.

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Rakim we talking about!

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Exactly.

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And Biz hooked up Big Daddy Kane with

Marley Marl.

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Everybody Marley Marl was, you know, he

wanted to, he was, he had so much

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influence back then.

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He was the guy to go see and Biz had that

direct contact with him.

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Um, I love this one quote that Jazzy Jeff

put out there.

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He said, Marley Marl was Dre before Dre

and the Juice crew was Wu Tang before Wu

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Tang.

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That one stuck with me.

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Yeah, yeah, the Juice crew, they was a

conglomerate of just raw hip hop talent.

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Like all of them have bars, every one of

them.

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They all have bars, all of them.

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I mean, Shan and Craig G and Kool G and

Shante and Biz.

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Like they all, and then Kane on the scene,

like Masta Ace, they all, all of them had

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rhyme skills.

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This for days, bars.

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And like Marley Marl was like a super

producer back then.

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And he had such reach because he had

direct line to WBLS.

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So whatever he had, he got direct line to

the airwaves with no middleman.

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That was crazy.

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That you could put, you could cut a song

with him and it'll be on the radio the

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same day.

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And they had tie into Uncle Ralph

McDaniels with Music Video Box.

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Cold Chillin' Records was born out of

this.

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And then, Biz’s influence was not only

in, you know, the hip hop music industry.

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You see Nick Cannon knew him from, used to

carry crates for him, I think.

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And Biz taught Nick Cannon how to charm the

women.

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And now the amount of kids he has, he did

a good job.

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I had to throw something like that out

there.

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Oh man.

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ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

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ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

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ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

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ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

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ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

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But yeah, Nick Cannon was really

influenced by Biz Markie.

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I didn't know that.

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And Tracy Morgan also was super close to

Biz Markie.

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They grew up together kind of.

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Yeah, yeah, I didn't even realize that.

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I didn't realize that they were as close

as they were.

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I mean, I knew that later on, Biz and Nick

Cannon were close, but I didn't know that

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it stemmed all the way back to Nick Cannon

being 17 and carrying some of Biz's crates

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for him when he had to do shows.

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I was like, wow, really?

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Because I've seen episodes of Wild'n Out

where Biz Markie would be on there.

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And you can definitely see that they were

close, but I didn't know how far back they

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went.

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Man.

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So let me transition into this.

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Um, this documentary was really produced

by his widow Tara Hall.

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And it was kind of her story to

commemorate Biz's life.

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Did you guys know anything about Tara Hall

prior to watching the documentary?

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If, and if not, what are your impressions

of her or either way, what are your

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impressions of Tara Hall?

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You want to take that, Boogie?

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I started following Tara Hall like a few

years back.

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I think it might've been, I don't know if

it was right when he got sick or right

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before he got sick, but I saw them in the

picture and I think and she was giving her

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a shout out or something like that.

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I was like, all right, you know, I'm gonna

follow her, all right.

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So I started following her.

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But I remember when he got sick, she was

always posting updates on him and just

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trying to, you know, keep him in good

spirits.

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just keeping, you know, knowing that, no,

he's not gone, he's still with us and he

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still needs prayers and things like that.

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And I thought she would seem pretty

genuine.

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And even now, like she still posts, you

know, every now and then about his legacy

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and like trying to hold people accountable

for different things.

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Like I think right now, one of the big

things was somebody, I think she said

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somebody who has a block on his Instagram

account.

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and they won't let it go.

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And I was like, wow.

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But one thing I didn't know was I didn't

realize that she was a model prior to

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getting married.

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And I said, I was kind of cool.

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And I also never knew the story of how

they met.

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So when she was telling the story about

how they met in New Orleans while he was

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DJing, I was like, okay.

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And then she said, you know, he was joking

around and asked for a phone number.

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So she was like, I give it to him,

whatever.

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And then he actually remembered her phone

number and called her back on that Monday.

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And it's like, I told you I wasn't gonna

forget and how they became friends and how

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the relationship progressed.

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And then he asked her to marry him, but

she wasn't ready at the time.

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She had a flourishing career.

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So she was doing music videos and photo

shoots and runway work.

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But then she came back 10 years later and

said that everything was kind of still

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where she left it.

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He said, I knew you were gonna come back.

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I was like, wow, that was kind of dope.

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I had to shed a little tear like.

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Pfft.

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Ha ha ha.

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That's really heartwarming, yeah.

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That was a touching story.

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Yeah, she seems like a lovely woman.

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I didn't really know much about her at

all.

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You mentioned the modeling, she was in a

lot of music videos like Boyz II Men, “I'll

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Make Love to You”, and a lot of popular

videos back then.

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Yeah, he kept, like you said, he kept

everything in the same place.

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She bought housewares, plates, stemware,

et cetera, for Biz’s house.

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But she was following up on her career.

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She came back 10 years later, everything

in the same place.

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And they ended up getting married at that

point.

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And they showed that.

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She had a daughter, so this became

Biz Markie's stepdaughter when they were

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married.

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He was such a, he seemed like such a good

father figure to the daughter, Avery,

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who's my daughter, same name.

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I thought that was such a cute thing that

he was, because he's such a kid himself,

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so he was great with her.

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Yeah.

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I didn't know anything about Tara Hall

either.

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And it turns out she had an amazing

career.

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I mean, Wilhemina Models is no joke.

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You get into that agency, you're really

doing something.

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And it takes a lot of strength to be

someone's medical advocate.

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I do a fair amount of reading about living

well and dying well, and a lot of it's

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about how you want your end to be and how

you wanna go and how kind of care you want

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at the end of your life.

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And...

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All of it's hard, and for her to do that,

for him, with, it's hard enough for a

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normal person, but for a celebrity like

Biz, it's even worse.

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And so I commend her for being strong

through all of this, and then telling her

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story afterwards with this documentary.

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What would you say is the most surprising

thing in this documentary, All Up in the

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Biz?

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Anything surprise you?

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Yeah, I mean, like, I think my most

surprising thing was one thing that we

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kind of touched on, we touched on already,

was how big of a collector he was.

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I mean, like, I knew he I knew he

collected things because, you know, every

372

:

now and then he posts stuff like, you

know, but I didn't realize that he had a

373

:

whole huge storage unit full of things.

374

:

I was like, wow, he's like a super

collector.

375

:

But um, but he said, you know,

376

:

he started collecting things from his

childhood that he never had.

377

:

And when I heard that, it kind of made

sense because he wouldn't really talk too

378

:

much about it, but I know that it was a

little rough on him sometimes.

379

:

And a lot of those toys that he was

talking about, those were the top of the

380

:

line toys back in the day.

381

:

Like I said, you're always teasing people

about having...

382

:

I have the first one of these or I bet you

don't have this.

383

:

And I was like, wow, that's kind of what

kids would do back in the day.

384

:

And it all made sense.

385

:

Okay, I was gonna say I didn't really, I

remember the song “Me and the Biz” by Masta

386

:

Ace in the video where he has the Biz

Markie puppet.

387

:

I love that song.

388

:

I used to imitate it, you know, with

tapping my neck, it's like me and the Biz,

389

:

that whole thing.

390

:

I didn't know that he didn't like that

song.

391

:

Like he wasn't happy with it.

392

:

And I don't know if he kind of cleared it

with him.

393

:

Maybe he thought it made him look silly or

something like that.

394

:

I love Masta Ace’s apology rap here in the

documentary.

395

:

He did a whole apology rap saying, you

know, he shouldn't have done that.

396

:

You should have went through him first.

397

:

And, uh, other surprising thing is the,

“Just A Friend” demo tape that was thrown

398

:

off the porch by one of the, was it

producers Bernard? Where like, it was so

399

:

unique and so out there that he's like,

no, this is not going to work.

400

:

And as soon as other, it got into other people's

hands, they're like, yeah, this, put this

401

:

out there, put this out there.

402

:

It's going to be a hit.

403

:

Yep.

404

:

I think it was it Shante that said that

he had to ice down his lips after some

405

:

beatboxing sessions.

406

:

That cracked me up.

407

:

I believe it.

408

:

That's got to be really hard like

physically.

409

:

I think the thing that most surprised me

was just how many careers he helped get

410

:

started.

411

:

I didn't realize that he was instrumental

with, I mean, two guys like Big Daddy Kane

412

:

and Rakim?

413

:

Holy cow.

414

:

Like without Biz, like we may not have

like got to witness this greatness.

415

:

Wow.

416

:

We're more in debt to Biz than we thought.

417

:

Yeah.

418

:

And like, you know, a lot of Rakim and

Big Daddy Kane are in a lot of people's

419

:

top five MCs of all time.

420

:

That's some heavy influence right there.

421

:

That just shows like, man.

422

:

Yeah, I got to see them both at the Rock

the Bells festival on August and it was

423

:

like these guys, legends, they still have

it, they're revered.

424

:

And if it wasn't for Biz Markie, they may

not have made it, you're right.

425

:

I mean, he was so influential.

426

:

It's unreal.

427

:

I also liked the scene of the Celebrity

Fit Club.

428

:

He won that Celebrity Fit Club when he had

lost the weight.

429

:

So I mean, whenever he put his mind to it,

he could do it.

430

:

It's a shame that he couldn't get his

health all the way back.

431

:

Um, couldn't really control it.

432

:

Unfortunately.

433

:

But yeah, you could tell the influence he

had on these guys.

434

:

Rakim was tearing up at the end.

435

:

And they filmed in the high school, that

Wyandanch High School where he had

436

:

performed with Biz.

437

:

And he was so grateful.

438

:

And Big Daddy King was effusing praise and

gratitude for all that Biz did for his

439

:

career.

440

:

You can tell he was revered by these guys.

441

:

And then you got the other MCs that he

kind of hung around with and influenced a

442

:

little bit back and forth.

443

:

EPMD, De La Soul.

444

:

I was like, wow.

445

:

They all have respect for him.

446

:

Yeah, a lot of those guys all grew up in the Long Island area.

447

:

So they were, they were tight.

448

:

Like that's a different breed.

449

:

Um, folks there.

450

:

I guess one final question as we wind down

is, did you like the overall format of the

451

:

documentary?

452

:

Did you like it in general?

453

:

Boogie?

454

:

Well, I mean, like general, the general

format for me was, was pretty good.

455

:

I mean, I like always incorporating people

that have that are, you know, close people

456

:

that are really close to them.

457

:

So just having like, you know, those,

those MCs that were really close to him,

458

:

giving insider perspective, you know, had

some family, some, some of his family

459

:

members with his foster brother and

sister.

460

:

Um, so I liked that, that format.

461

:

The one thing that kind of, but that was a

little.

462

:

kind of weirded me a little bit with the

segments with the puppet, with the Biz

463

:

puppet.

464

:

It was kind of, it was, I wouldn't say

that it weirded me a little bit, but it

465

:

just made me real sad.

466

:

But I do understand why Tara included

those segments.

467

:

I think those segments were very

therapeutic for her because she got to

468

:

express her perspective on what was going

on while he was sick.

469

:

and just showing some transparency into

how she was dealing with him.

470

:

So I understand it from that perspective.

471

:

Well, over the first time I saw it, I was

like, whoa.

472

:

You know, it took me back a little bit,

but I got used to it after like, you know,

473

:

the first couple of them, I was like, all

right, all right.

474

:

This is not meant to be any kind of slight

or a diss to him or anything like that.

475

:

I just kind of think she's kind of talk

was talking herself through it and just

476

:

sharing that with us while she was talking

herself through it.

477

:

It was interesting and clever.

478

:

I'm not sure it landed completely, but the

way you say that this is more for her to

479

:

talk through and process the experience

makes sense in that case.

480

:

The idea of using a puppet is really fun,

and Biz Markie was a fun guy.

481

:

So some of these fictionalized

reenactments and things, I think that part

482

:

worked for me.

483

:

But the...

484

:

The thing I really enjoyed, and this was

very surprising, was that opening credit

485

:

sequence set to the Bread song, “It Don't

Matter to Me”, which this reflects how wide

486

:

range Biz's musical tastes were.

487

:

When I saw Biz, he came out on stage to do

“Bennie and the Jets” by Elton John during a

488

:

Beastie

489

:

Boys show.

490

:

And this is similar to

491

:

what we saw in Dear Mama where Tupac loved

the song “Vincent” by Don MacLean.

492

:

And so, you know, it just shows that, you

know, these old, the OGs, they really drew

493

:

on some of the stuff that they grew up

around, including things you wouldn't

494

:

normally associate with these soft rock

guys like Don MacLean or David Gates in

495

:

Bread.

496

:

And so I need to know more about that part

because it was really like poignant.

497

:

It set the mood in a way I didn't expect.

498

:

Prince Paul did the music for this and

Prince Paul was the one who kind of

499

:

introduced us to De La Sol and did a lot

of the production for them.

500

:

So he was kind of behind that and it was a

great selection, I agree.

501

:

The puppet thing to me was a little bit

jarring at first, like you said, but I

502

:

agree.

503

:

It's kind of a nod to his playful nature.

504

:

It's almost like I could see Biz Markie

being like a permanent fixture as like a

505

:

Sesame Street character because he was

just so jovial and

506

:

great with the kids and you can see,

remember he was on Yo Gabba Gabba, that

507

:

Nickelodeon show that my kids used to

watch.

508

:

And I remember the first time that Biz

popped up on there and he said, Biz's Beat

509

:

of the Day, and he was teaching how to

beatbox.

510

:

I'm like, this is brilliant.

511

:

And my kids got a good chuckle out of that

and they would look forward to seeing

512

:

I was like, that's Biz, I'm trying to

teach them.

513

:

Yeah, Yo Gabba Gabba, I mean, that was

amazing.

514

:

But yeah, I like the format overall.

515

:

Like you said,

516

:

It showed the hospital scenes.

517

:

You see the upbringing, there's a lot of

people that he influenced in his life,

518

:

including those mega hip hop stars and

entertainers.

519

:

And it was just a touching tribute

overall.

520

:

Like I'm glad that Tara got to tell her

story because, and then at the end,

521

:

there's a speech she gives a little

soliloquy at the end where I guess there

522

:

was some negativity surrounding

523

:

Biz’s death, people tried to sue

Biz’s estate and misappropriate funds.

524

:

So she wanted to have her say at the end

there as well.

525

:

Yeah.

526

:

Yeah, that's some of that stuff that

should be mentioned with some of the stuff

527

:

that I've seen in posts.

528

:

Yeah.

529

:

I'm glad we watched this one.

530

:

Biz was such a great character.

531

:

Truly a pioneer.

532

:

Yeah, one part that I caught, it showed us

there was a still shot of Biz with, um, oh

533

:

god, I can't think of her name, um,

stepdaughter.

534

:

And he had on, um, a t-shirt and you look

real close at it.

535

:

It was from the shirt that he had was one

of Ramo's, um, burners from Beat Street.

536

:

Yeah.

537

:

It was the Graffiti is our Art.

538

:

It was Ramo, yeah.

539

:

Graffiti is an Art and If Art is a Crime...

540

:

I was like, oh wow.

541

:

Yeah.

542

:

Oh.

543

:

Yeah, I hope in his collection of some of

those early, I mean, the t-shirt stuff,

544

:

was it Shirt Kings or something?

545

:

Yeah, Shirt Kings.

546

:

Shirt Kings he referenced and he was big

with them and Boogie you said Dapper Dan and

547

:

some of his stuff will be memorialized in

some of the museums.

548

:

There was something that I saw was at the

Universal Hip-Hop Museum in the South

549

:

Bronx.

550

:

The December 11, 1985 Biz in the

studio with Roxanne Shante, famous scene

551

:

and that pictures and or videos of that

are like memorialized at the Hip-Hop, Universal Hip-Hop Museum.

552

:

Yeah, Biz Markie was a real treasure,

national treasure that we lost too soon.

553

:

Go see this, everybody.

554

:

Yeah, this is definitely worth your time.

555

:

Definitely, definitely.

556

:

On the next episode of the Hip Hop Movie

Club Podcast, your HHMC's review In Too

557

:

Deep with Omar Epps and LL Cool J.

558

:

Subscribe now on your favorite podcast app

and you won't miss it.

559

:

Shout out to your listeners.

560

:

Thanks for tuning in.

561

:

And remember, don't hate, accommodate.

562

:

Accommodate.

563

:

Nice.

564

:

Right on.

565

:

Even in death, nobody beats the biz.

566

:

Wait, I messed it up.

567

:

have to say, nobody beats it.

568

:

You have to emphasize the first part,

yeah.

569

:

Yeah.

570

:

Yeah, that's right.

571

:

I had the wrong one.

572

:

Wrong arrangement.

Show artwork for Hip Hop Movie Club

About the Podcast

Hip Hop Movie Club
Harmonizing the rhythm of hip hop with the magic of movies
This show harmonizes the rhythm of hip hop with the magic of movies!

HHMC is brought to you by a trio of longtime hip hop fans: JB, an 80s and 90s nostalgia junkie, Boogie, a veteran DJ and graffiti artist, and DynoWright, podcaster and filmmaker.

Upcoming Hip Hop Movie Club events:
Feb 15 - Samples N' Friends, Rider University
https://www.rider.edu/about/events/black-history-month

Feb 28 - Juice screening and talkback, SteelStacks, Bethlehem PA
https://www.steelstacks.org/event/15642/juice/

More events to be announced! Subscribe to our newsletter and get updated on events: https://hiphopmovieclub.substack.com/